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Dealing with a Honey Bee Swarm in Columbus, OH

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Dealing with a Honey Bee Swarm in Columbus, OH

If you have ever been subjected to a sting from a honey bee, it may be hard to keep in mind their more helpful traits, such as making honey and pollinating flowers. Also, if you ever bump into a Honey Bee Swarm in Columbus OH, you may very well conclude those benefits are overshadowed by their power to create a nuisance.

However, a swarm is simply standard procedure for a honey bee hive. Usually, in late spring and early summer, swarming will take place as a reaction to a hive’s overcrowding. A swarm may be made up of a few thousand worker bees, several drones, and one lone queen. They fly for a short time and, in due course, land as one on a tree limb or other random object. As the swarm comes to rest at this new locale, scouts are sent out to hunt for a fresh nesting place. More often than not, if a swarm is encountered on a tree or house, they can be ignored. As soon as the scouts successfully discover a new home for the hive, the Honey Bee Swarm in Columbus OH will be in motion, heading for its new locale.

On occasion, honey bees will pick out a spot that is problematic for their human neighbors and will need to be removed. The first step is making sure the insects you are dealing with are, indeed, honey bees and not wasps, hornets, or yellow jackets. Bees have hairs on their torsos. Wasps are smooth. Also, check the nest. Honey bees assemble theirs out of wax. The others make use of dirt or wood filaments in their structures.

When you have verified it is honey bees you are dealing with, the next step is to get in touch with a beekeeper. A beekeeper will have the capability of moving the hive and, in the process, assisting an endangered species. Honey bees have been vanishing at a rapid rate and, without them to carry out their pollination responsibilities, every plant on our planet could be adversely impacted. A beekeeper can, almost always, remove both the bees and their hive without damage. Find more information by contacting your local beekeepers’ association.

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